Horseradish Crusted Salmon with Braised Greens
Alaska Salmon and Russet Potatoe Hash
Scottish Salmon & Avocado Salad
Timbales of Smoked Salmon
Layered Salmon Terrine
Croissants W/ Avocado & Smoked Salmon
Poached Salmon Cutlets W/ Hot Basil Sauce
Poached Salmon
Whole Salmon in Aspic
Whole Baked Salmon W/ Spinach Stuffing(Scottish Elizabethan)
California-Style Salmon
"Little Chief" Smoked Salmon Deluxe
Smoking Salmon and Trout #1 - Caring for the Catch
Smoking Salmon and Trout #2 - Filleting And Boning
Smoking Salmon and Trout #3 - Smoking Fish
Smoking Salmon and Trout #4 - Scotch Smoking Preparation
Smoking Salmon and Trout #5 - Scotch Smoking Prep Continu
Smoking Salmon and Trout #6 - Scotch Smoking
Smoking Salmon and Trout #7 - Kippering And Barbecuing
Smoking Salmon and Trout #8 - Making Lox
Smoking Salmon and Trout #9 - Indian or Hard Smoked
Smoking Salmon and Trout #10 - Smoking Small Trout
Smoking Salmon and Trout #11 - Pickled Smoked Fish
Smoking Salmon and Trout #12 - Making Seelachs
Smoking Salmon and Trout #13 - Smoking for Canning
Canned Salmon
Smoking Salmon and Trout #14 - Smoking Roes And Liver
Smoking Salmon and Trout #15 - Salting
Smoking Salmon and Trout #16 - Caviar
Smoking Salmon and Trout #17 - Freezing Fish
Herb-Grilled Salmon
Braised Whole Fillet of Salmon (Julia Child)
Salmon in Pastry
Broiled Salmon with Fines Herb Sauce
Herbed Roasted Salmon and Vegetables W/lemon Chive Sauce
Baked Salmon
New Zealand Salmon in Jelly
Quebec Poached Salmon
Broiled Salmon Steak with French Dressing
Orange Salmon Steaks
Salmon Steak En Papillote
Salmon Steaks Almondine
Salmon Steaks in Herb Blankets
Salmon Steaks Vinaigrette
Eileens Salmon Steaks
Grilled Salmon Steaks in Sauce
Barbq Smokegrilled Salmon


     Title: Horseradish Crusted Salmon with Braised Greens
Categories: Seafoods
     Yield: 4 Servings

     8    New potatoes
     3 tb Canola oil divided
     1 c  Chopped parsley
     3 tb Minced garlic clove divided
     2 tb Drained prepared
          Horseradish
   1/2 ts Grated lemon zest
     1 c  Japanese style bread crumbs
   1/2 c  Extra virgin olive oil
          Divided
          Salt and pepper to taste
     4    Salmon fillets 6 oz each
          Thawed
     1 c  Fish stock or bottled clam
          Juice
     8 c  Mixed braising greens chard
          Kale mustard greens or
          Endive
          Lemon Juice

  Preheat oven to 425.  Scrub the potatoes and cut them into quarters.
  Place in a shallow roasting pan and toss with 1 tb of Canola oil
  until coated. Roast for 45 minutes to 1 hour or until tender and
  browned. In a small bowl mix together parsley 2 tb of garlic
  horseradish and lemon zest. Toss in the bread crumbs.  Drizzle with
  1/3 cup of olive oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper.  Toss
  again until mixed. Season the salmon fillets with salt and pepper.
  Heat the remaining canola oil in a large skillet over medium high
  heat. When it is hot sear the salmon fillets top side down until
  lightly browned 2 to 3 minutes.  Arrange the fillets seared side up
  in a lightly greased baking pan just large enough to hold them.
  Sprinkle the fillets evenly with the bread mixture creating a crust
  that is 1/8 to 1/4 inch thick.  Roast until crust is golden brown and
  the fish is firm 5 to 7 minutes.  While salmon is roasting bring fish
  stock, remaining olive oil and remaining garlic to a boil in a large
  saucepan. Stir in the greens cover and cook until just wilted 2 to 3
  minutes. Season with lemon juice and salt and pepper.  To serve
  arrange greens in the centre of 4 shallow bowls surrounded by the
  roasted potatoes and the cooking liquid from the greens. Place a
  piece of roasted salmon on top of each serving. Recipes served at
  Higgins Restaurant and Bar




     Title: Alaska Salmon and Russet Potatoe Hash
Categories: Seafoods
     Yield: 4 Servings

     4    Russet potatoes peeled.
     1 lg Onion
     4 tb Canola oil
   3/4 lb Cooked fresh or canned
          Salmon about 2 cups
   3/4 lb Smoked salmon
     1 c  Sour cream
   1/2 c  Chopped dill pickles
     2 tb Dijon mustard
     2 tb Whole grain mustard
          Salt and freshly ground
          Pepper
          Finely chopped dill pickle
          For garnish

  Preheat oven to 375.  Shred the potatoes and blanch them lightly in
  salted water until tender drain and cool.  In a skillet saute onion
  in oil over medium high heat stirring until tender 3 to 5 minutes. In
  a large bowl flake the fresh salmon and the smoked salmon. Stir in
  the cooked potatoes and onion 1/2 cup of the sour cream pickles and
  mustards. Season with salt and pepper.  Spread salmon hash in shallow
  lightly greased casserole in a 1 to 1 1/2 inch thick layer. Bake for
  25 to 30 minutes or until golden brown and heated through. To serve
  spoon the hash onto plates dividing evenly. Garnish with sour cream
  and chopped pickle. Makes 4 servings.

     Title: Scottish Salmon & Avocado Salad
Categories: Scot/irish, Fish, Salads
     Yield: 4 Servings

          **  British Measurements  **
     1 lb Scottish Salmon; cooked,
          .  chilled & cut into strips
     1 pk Mixed salad greens
     2    Avocados; halved & peeled
     1    Lemon; juiced

-----------------------------VINAIGRETTE-----------------------------
   1/4 pt Extra-virgin olive oil
     1 tb Balsamic vinegar
     1 tb Lime juice
     2 fl Wine vinegar
     1 cl Garlic; crushed
     1 ts Dijon mustard
       pn Sugar
          Salt & pepper to taste
     1 ts Parsley or chives; chopped
          Basil sprigs for garnish

  **  British Measurements  **
 
  Place all ingredients for the vinaigrette in a screw top jar and shake
  vigorously to emulsify. Toss the mixed salad greens with 4 Tbsp of the
  vinaigrette, and place a little salad on each plate.
 
  Slice the avocados into a fan shape. Place one half decoratively on
  each plate. Sprinkle with lemon juice to prevent discoloration.
 
  Place the fish beside the avocado, and drizzle over a little extra
  vinaigrette, season to taste and garnish with sprigs of basil.
  "Scottish Salmon"
      by   Mary MacDonald Reed Consumer Books, Ltd., London 1995 ISBN =
  0-600-58480-1
 
  Scanned and formatted for you by  The WEE Scot  --  pol mac Griogair


     Title: Timbales of Smoked Salmon
Categories: Scot/irish, Fish
     Yield: 4 Servings

          **  British Measurements  **
     4 oz Smoked salmon; thinly sliced
     4 fl Creme fraiche; chilled
     2 tb Red caviar or salmon roe
       pn Cayenne  (or dash of Tabasco
          .  sauce or to taste)

-----------------------------TOMATO PUREE-----------------------------
     4    Tomatoes; skinned & chopped
          Salt and freshly ground
          .  black pepper to taste

-------------------------------GARNISH-------------------------------
          Fresh chives or dill; snippd
          Whole sprigs of chives or
          .  dill

  **  British Measurements  **
 
  Rinse 4 small souffle dishes and line with dampened greaseproof
  paper. Line with slices of smoked salmon and trim them level with the
  rims. Chop the trimmings finely. Beat the creme fraiche until soft
  peaks form, and fold in the chopped salmon, caviar and cayenne pepper
  or Tabasco sauce.
 
  Fill the moulds, cover and chill overnight.
 
  Puree the tomato flesh then rub through a fine sieve. Season with
  salt and pepper and chill.
 
  Unmould the timbales onto individual serving plates and spoon a
  circle of tomato puree around each one. Sprinkle with snipped chives
  or dill and garnish with whole chives or sprigs of dill. "Scottish
  Salmon"
      by   Mary MacDonald Reed Consumer Books, Ltd., London 1995 ISBN =
  0-600-58480-1
 
  Scanned and formatted for you by  The WEE Scot  --  pol mac Griogair


     Title: Layered Salmon Terrine
Categories: Scot/irish, Fish
     Yield: 8 Servings

          **  British Measurements  **
     8 oz Salmon; bones & skin removed
   1/2 pt Double (heavy) cream
     3    Eggs
     1 tb Dill; chopped
          Salt & pepper to taste
     1 oz Butter
     2 oz Pine nuts
     8 oz Prawns; uncooked, peeled &
          .  deveined
     8 oz Spinach leaves; washed &
          .  blanched
          Sprigs of dill for garnish

  **  British Measurements  **
 
  Puree the fish, cream, eggs, dill, salt and pepper until smooth and
  creamy. Remove and set aside.
 
  In a small pan, melt the butter and saute the pine nuts for a few
  seconds or until golden. Process the prawns for a few seconds,
  remove, mix in the pine nuts, and season to taste.
 
  Grease a 1 kg / 2 lb  terrine and line with spinach leaves, leaving
  enough to wrap over the top. Pour in half the salmon mixture, add a
  layer of spinach, a layer of prawn mixture, and another layer of
  spinach. Pour in the remaining salmon mixture and fold the spinach
  over the top. Cover with foil, place in a "bain-marie" and cook in a
  preheated oven at 325øF / 160øC / gas mark 3  for about 40 to 50
  minutes, or until the terrine is firm to the touch.
 
  Remove and cool before unmoulding. Chill for about 2 hours before
  serving, cut into slices and garnish with sprigs of dill. "Scottish
  Salmon"
      by   Mary MacDonald Reed Consumer Books, Ltd., London 1995 ISBN =
  0-600-58480-1
 
  Scanned and formatted for you by  The WEE Scot  --  pol mac Griogair



     Title: Croissants W/ Avocado & Smoked Salmon
Categories: Scot/irish, Fish, Sandwiches
     Yield: 8 Servings

          **  British Measurements  **
     8    Butter croissants
     8 sl Smoked salmon
     4 lg Avocados; halved
     8 ts Salmon roe or caviar (opt)
          Freshly ground black pepper

  **  British Measurements  **
 
  Warm the croissants in the oven at 425øF / 220øC / gas mark 7, remove
  and split in half lengthways, leaving a "hinge", like a book. Cut the
  smoked salmon diagonally into strips.
 
  Scrape out the avocado flesh, including the bright green parts, and
  heap generously over one half of each croissant.
 
  Place in the oven for a few minutes until the avocado is warm.
 
  Remove and place on a serving plate. Arrange slices of smoked salmon
  attractively on top of the avocado. Sprinkle with pepper.
 
  Press the top half of each croissant at an angle on top of the
  avocado and salmon. Garnish with salmon roe or caviar, if liked.
  "Scottish Salmon"
      by   Mary MacDonald Reed Consumer Books, Ltd., London 1995 ISBN =
  0-600-58480-1
 
  Scanned and formatted for you by  The WEE Scot  --  pol mac Griogair


     Title: Poached Salmon Cutlets W/ Hot Basil Sauce
Categories: Scot/irish, Fish, Sauces
     Yield: 6 Servings

          **  British Measurements  **
     4    Ribs celery; chopped
     1    Carrot; peeled & chopped
     1 sm Onion; peeled & chopped
     1 bn Fresh basil; leaves stripped
          .  from stalks
     6    Salmon cutlets or steaks
          .  about 4oz each & 1 inch
          .  thick
     3 fl White wine
     4 fl Water
          Salt & pepper to taste
     1 ts Lemon juice
   1/2 oz Butter; unsalted
          Salt & pepper to taste

  **  British Measurements  **
 
  Spread all the vegetables over the bottom of a large flameproof dish,
  bed the salmon cutlets into the vegetables and cover them with half
  the basil. Reserve the remaining basil.
 
  Pour over the wine and water, season, bring to a boil, cover and
  simmer for 10 minutes. Place the salmon on a warmed serving dish.
 
  Bring the liquid back to the boil and simmer for 5 minutes.  Strain
  into a liquidizer. Add the cooked and uncooked basil, and puree.
  Place in a pan, bring to the boil and reduce by half, until thickened.
 
  Remove from the heat, stir in the lemon juice and butter, pour over
  the salmon cutlets and serve. "Scottish Salmon"
      by   Mary MacDonald Reed Consumer Books, Ltd., London 1995 ISBN =
  0-600-58480-1
 
  Scanned and formatted for you by  The WEE Scot  --  pol mac Griogair


     Title: Poached Salmon
Categories: Scot/irish, Fish
     Yield: 24 Servings

          **  British Measurements  **
     1    Salmon;  about 12 lb

----------------------------COURT BOUILLON----------------------------
     3 pt Cold water
     1 md Onion; finely sliced
     1    Carrot; finely sliced
     3    Sprigs parsley
     3    Sprigs thyme
     3    Sprigs tarragon
     1    Bay leaf
     1 ts Salt
     5    Peppercorns
     1 tb Olive oil
     1 sm Cucumber; peeled & thinly
          .  sliced for garnish

  **  British Measurements  **
 
  Pour the water for the court bouillon into a fish kettle with all the
  other ingredients except the olive oil. Boil for 30 minutes.
 
  Remove from the heat and add the olive oil. Carefully lower the
  salmon into the liquid, which should just cover it.
 
  Bring back to the boil, then simmer very gently for 30 minutes, or
  until the salmon flesh leaves the bones easily. Lift out on to a flat
  serving dish, garnish with thin slices of cucumber and serve hot with
  Hollandaise sauce, or cold with Mayonnaise and a cucumber salad.
 
  To serve cold, cool in the liquid, lift out and chill. "Scottish
  Salmon"
      by   Mary MacDonald Reed Consumer Books, Ltd., London 1995 ISBN =
  0-600-58480-1
 
  Scanned and formatted for you by  The WEE Scot  --  pol mac Griogair


     Title: Whole Salmon in Aspic
Categories: Scot/irish, Fish
     Yield: 8 Servings

          **  British Measurements  **
     1    Scottish salmon; about 4 lb
          .  cleaned & scaled with
          .  head & tail left on &
          .  poached in water to
          .  cover, as in other recipe
     1 tb Madeira or dry sherry
     2 tb Powdered gelatine
     4    Sprigs fresh tarragon
     1 sm Cucumber; thinly sliced

  **  British Measurements  **
 
  Poach, cool and chill the fish. Skin the salmon, leaving the head and
  tail on, and transfer to a serving plate.
 
  Strain the stock into a clean saucepan, boil and skim while reducing
  to 1 pint. Cool for 10 to 15 minutes then blot any fat off the
  surface with paper towels. Stir in the Madeira or sherry.
 
  Mix the gelatine with 3 Tbsp water in a bowl and stand over simmering
  water until dissolved. Whisk into the stock and leave until just
  beginning to set (the consistency of egg whites).
 
  Dip tarragon sprigs into the setting aspic and arrange down the
  length of the fish. Dip cucumber slices in the aspic and arrange some
  in a "collar" at the head end, and some at the tail end. Leave until
  set.
 
  Coat the fish with a thin layer of aspic and leave until set. Repeat
  the process, using all the aspic.
 
  When set, dip a sharp thin-bladed knife into cold water, and cut
  through the aspic right around the fish. Scrape the aspic off the
  platter, chop finely and sprinkle over the fish. Wipe the platter
  clean and serve. "Scottish Salmon"
      by   Mary MacDonald Reed Consumer Books, Ltd., London 1995 ISBN =
  0-600-58480-1
 
  Scanned and formatted for you by  The WEE Scot  --  pol mac Griogair


     Title: Whole Baked Salmon W/ Spinach Stuffing(Scottish Elizabethan)
Categories: Scot/irish, Medieval, Fish
     Yield: 4 Servings

          **  British Measurements  **
     3 lb Salmon, carp or other
          .  freshwater fish; cleaned
          Salt & pepper to taste
     1 c  Spinach; cooked & chopped
     1 oz Wholemeal breadcrumbs
       pn Ground cinnamon
       pn Sugar
     1 oz Currants
     1    Egg yolk
  1 1/2 tb Butter; melted
   1/4 pt Dry white wine
     2 sl Wholemeal bread; toasted &
          .  cut into triangles
          Oranges; sliced for garnish
          Fresh dill sprigs as garnish

  Preheat oven to 350øF / 180øC / gas mark 4.
 
  Sprinkle the cavity of the fish with salt and black pepper. In a
  bowl, mix together the spinach, breadcrumbs, cinnamon, sugar,
  currants and egg yolk. Season with salt and pepper. Use the mixture
  to stuff the fish and keep in place with wooden cocktail sticks or
  skewers. Place the fish in a buttered roasting tin and brush
  liberally with the melted butter. Pour the wine over the fish and
  bake uncovered for 30 to 40 minutes depending on the size, basting
  several times. Divide the fish into four portions, discarding all the
  skin, bones and head. Serve with the cooking juices poured over and
  garnished with toast, orange slices and dill.
 
  Makes about 4 servings. ** A Book of Historical Recipes **
     by    Sara Paston-Williams The National Trust of Scotland, 1995
  ISBN = 0-7078-0240-7
 
  Scanned and formatted for you by  The WEE Scot  --  pol mac Griogair
 
  ORIGINAL RECIPE::
 
  Pudding in a Tench    (dated from 1584 AD)
 
  "Take your Tench and drawe it very clene and cut it not over lowe.
  Then take beets boyled, or Spinage, and chop it with yolks of hard
  Eggs, Corance, grated Bread, Salt, Pepper, Sugar and Sinamon and
  yolks of rawe Eggs, and mingle it togither, and put it in the Tenches
  belly. Then put it in a platter with faire water and sweet butter and
  turn it in the Platter and set it in the Oven, when it is inough;
  serve it with sippets and poure the licour that it was boiled in upon
  it."


     Title: California-Style Salmon
Categories: Seafoods
     Yield: 4 Servings

     4    8-10 oz. salmon steaks
     1 c  Ripe olives; chopped
   1/2 c  Chopped tomatoes
   1/4 c  Chopped onion
     1 tb Vegetable oil
     1 tb Fresh cilantro; minced
     1 ts Garlic; minced (or more)

  Grill salmon being careful to not overcook.  Meanwhile, in a medium
  bowl, combine olivesm tomato, onion cilantro, oil and garlic.  Mix
  well. Garnish with cilantro if desired.
 
  Serves 4.
 
  (A National Fisheries Institute calendar recipe.)


     Title: "Little Chief" Smoked Salmon Deluxe
Categories: Bbq/grill, Fish
     Yield: 1 Servings

   1/3 c  Sugar
   1/4 c  Non-iodized salt
     2 c  Soy sauce
     1 c  Water
   1/2 ts Onion powder
   1/2 ts Garlic powder
   1/2 ts Pepper
   1/2 ts Tabasco sauce
     1 c  Dry white wine

  Mix thoroughly.  Brine salmon chunks 8 or more hours, keeping
  refrigerated. Rinse thoroughly after brining.  Pat dry with a paper
  towell and allow to air dry for at least one hour prior to smoking.
 
  (also used for Steelhead and other large trout)
 
  Credit: Luhr-Jensen From: cstarz@teleport.Com (Carey Starzidate:
  96-05-31 10:21:18 Edt


     Title: Smoking Salmon and Trout #1 - Caring for the Catch
Categories: Fish, Smoked, Info
     Yield: 1 Text file

          Information only

  Fish begins to spoil the minute you land it. Enzymes and bacteria go
  to work immediately especially in the slime, gills and intestines. To
  reduce spoilage and maintain flavor you must bleed, clean and cool
  fish quickly.
 
  1. Remove the slime and scale [if applicable] as soon as possible.
 
  2. Cut the throat and remove the gills. The intestines can wait a few
  hours.
 
  3. Remove the intestines. Save the liver, roe and milt. Remove the
  kidney, that dark streak along the backbone by cutting away the
  covering membrane on either side of the kidney,  where it is attached
  to the flesh. Then scrape out the kidney.
 
  4. The head may stay on but remove the head now if you have to save
  cooler space. Leave the lug bone, that bony plate behind the head if
  you are going to smoke the fish as the lug will support the handling
  cord.
 
  5. Cool the fish to close to freezing with chipped ice. Make sure that
  there is a layer of ice between every layer of fish in the cooler.
 
  Careless handling can bruise fish. Use a net if possible; if gaffing,
  gaff the least valuable part - the stomach if possible. If using a
  fish club to kill quickly and prevent threshing, one sharp blow to
  the head is enough.
 
  Rigor Mortis: a dead fish will stiffen but in time will relax again
  unless it goes into accelerated rigor from being too warm. If you try
  to straighten out a fish in Rigor or the fish goes into heat induced
  Rigor, you will tear the flesh disturbing the appearance and allowing
  succulent juices to escape. Prevent Rigor damage with prompt cooling
  and filleting before or after the fish has passed through rigor but
  not during it.
 
  Cooling: Ice has a terrific ability to absorb heat when it melts as
  it took a tremendous amount of heat removal to freeze the water in
  the first place. 2 lb of ice melting will do the same job of cooling
  as 37 lb of block ice or extremely cold water. Chipped ice will melt
  faster and therefore chill fish quicker than block ice. Pack the
  belly cavity of cleaned fish and make sure there is a layer of ice
  between every layer of fish.
 
  To transport frozen fish you need dry ice or Eutectic ice, as melting
  ice would thaw frozen fish. Eutectic ice is a solution of 23% salt by
  weight and 77% water by weight, which freezes at 0 deg F. [-18 deg
  C.], in a break proof plastic container. You can buy these or make
  your own.
 
  Extracted from: Smoking Salmon & Trout by Jack Whelan. Published by:
  Airie Publishing, Deep Bay, B.C. ISBN: 0-919807-00-3 Posted by: Jim
  Weller


     Title: Smoking Salmon and Trout #2 - Filleting And Boning
Categories: Fish, Smoked, Info
     Yield: 1 Text file

          Information only

  A very sharp knife [and a whet stone and a sharpening steel nearby] is
  essential.
 
  1. Skin on Fillets: Begin at the vent [anus] making a cut on either
  side of the anal fin just deep enough to reach the backbone.  Make
  these cuts all the way back to the tail.
 
  Start the next cut where the head has been removed on top of the
  backbone. Cut through the fish, from back to belly, lengthways right
  down to the tail. You will run into the belly bones which get tougher
  as the fish gets bigger. Here is where the *sharp* knife comes in; it
  must be able to cut through the belly bones easily. As you continue
  the cut from head to tail work the knife along the backbone with the
  cutting edge slightly slanted towards the bone.
 
  Remove the first fillet, turn the fish over and cut the second fillet.
  There should be very little meat left on the backbone.
 
  Now the belly bones can be removed without losing any meat. This
  leaves you a boneless fillet except for the line of long, thin bones
  just above where the backbone used to be. You can feel their sharp
  ends with your fingertip.
 
  These last bones can be lifted out in a strip by making a cut on
  either side of the row _just_ to the skin. This final deboning will
  somewhat spoil the fillet in appearance and utility when making
  smoked products that are thinly sliced. A more finicky method is to
  remove these bones one at a time with small needle nose pliers. If
  the bones don't pull out of the flesh readily, you can do it after
  smoking.
 
  2. - Easy Skinless Fillets: [This section by JW not the author.]  Most
  smoke recipes call for skin on fillets but for sauteing, frying,
  poaching and grilling fresh fish the easiest way to get a skinless
  fillet with just a little waste is as follows:
 
  Start with whole fish, uncleaned and head on. Make the first cut just
  below the gills done to the backbone at a slight angle. Turn the
  knife and cut along the backbone to the tail at a slight angle so as
  to "float" over the belly bones. Stop just short of the tail and peel
  back the skin-on fillet without tearing it away from where it is
  attached to the fish at the tail. Lay the fillet on the table skin
  side down and start a cut at the tail. Cut down to but not through
  the skin and turn the blade sideways. Cut the fillet away from the
  skin and continue back up the fillet to the other end.
 
  Turn over the fish and repeat. Be careful throughout not to puncture
  the intestines, bladder or stomach. You should now have two skinless
  fillets with the guts still attached to the carcass. This way you do
  not have to scale or clean and you loose only a small amount of meat
  and belly skin. This works best on larger fish say 4 lb and up. -JW
 
  3. - Defatting Fat Fish: Salmon and trout are fat fish and you *may*
  want to defat them for various reasons- to adhere to a low fat diet
  or remove contaminants that may be concentrated in the fat tissues of
  fish from certain waters. To do this, when you fillet, leave plenty
  of meat on the backbone where the meat is especially fat. Cut off the
  belly portion. Skin the fillet leaving about 1/8" meat on the skin.
  Make cuts on either side of the lateral line, lift it out and discard
  it.
 
  4. - Boning Small Trout:
 
  French Presentation I - Through the back with the belly uncut. Start
  by snipping the fins off with scissors. With a small knife cut the
  gills loose at the throat. With your fingers pull the gills loose
  along with most of the intestines. Make a cut along one side of the
  backbone, working the meat loose from the bone and all the way to the
  belly without cutting the belly skin. Repeat on the other side. with
  scissors snip the backbone as close to the tail as possible and then
  again at the head. Now you can finish cleaning the belly cavity with
  your fingers and the fish with head and tail on is ready for smoking
  or cooking.
 
  French Presentation II- Boning through the belly. After cleaning,
  start by making a cut from the vent, along each side of the backbone
  to the tail. Then work the meat loose from the rib cage and along the
  backbone to but not through the skin of the back. Then snip off the
  backbone close to the tail. Pull the bone free up to the head and
  snip off. Scissor off the fins. Ready for smoking or cooking.
 
  Extracted from: Smoking Salmon & Trout by Jack Whelan. Published by:
  Airie Publishing, Deep Bay, B.C. ISBN: 0-919807-00-3 Posted by: Jim
  Weller


     Title: Smoking Salmon and Trout #3 - Smoking Fish
Categories: Fish, Smoked, Info
     Yield: 1 Text file

          Information Only

  There are several methods that fall into two overall categories: Hot
  smoked [cooked] methods include barbecued, kippered, smoked-canned
  and small whole fish and Cold Smoked [below 85 deg F] include
  Scotch/Irish/Norwegian/Nova Scotian style, Lox, Indian or hard
  smoked, pickled-smoked, Seelachs and smoked roes & livers.
 
  Cold smoked products are still raw, deeply colored, with a texture
  like cured ham and can be thinly sliced without crumbling. Hot smoked
  products are colored on the outside only and will flake like other
  styles of cooked fish.
 
  Barbecued: or smoke-cooked fish is made in a pre-heated covered
  barbecue or a box-and-hotplate smoker. The fish is cooked in a smoky
  atmosphere without preliminary cold smoking or prior conditioning.
 
  Kippered: fish are conditioned before hot smoking by first drying the
  fish in barely warm air, then bringing it up to cooking temperature
  gradually to improve its appearance and quality.
 
  Canning: fish is first lightly smoked by putting it into a pre- heated
  smoker. High temperatures are used to draw the oil out to the
  surface. The smoking is light as the flavor will intensify during the
  pressure cooking stage. The fish should also be further dried before
  canning.
 
  Cold smoked: is known variously as Scotch, Irish, Norwegian or nova
  Scotian smoked and is appreciated by gourmets more than any other
  method. The fish are salted before smoking and is still raw although
  it is cured when finished.
 
  Lox: or Lachs [German] can mean many things- traditionally fresh fish
  lightly salted and mildly smoke cured [therefore still needing
  refrigeration and is perishable], recently frozen fish thawed,
  salt-sugar cured and lightly smoked [Nova Lax] and even salt-sugar
  cured and unsmoked.
 
  Hard smoked: jerky like and so dehydrated that it does not need
  refrigeration; based on traditional Native Indian preparations of
  cutting fillets into thin strips. These strips are partially dried by
  wind on sunny days or by fan in a dehydrator or a force draft smoker
  and smoked for only a portion of the drying time.
 
  Pickle-smoked: fish are pickled before smoking. This is a good way to
  enhance the taste of lean fish that do not otherwise smoke well.
 
  Seelachs: or ersatz salmon are salted, sliced thin, then dyed and
  smoked white fish.
 
  The Smoking Process: When fish is smoked it is also dried which
  improves the keeping qualities and improves the texture. Hot smoking
  also cooks the fish. The steps are filleting, cutting, salting,
  curing, smoking and final preservation.
 
  Filleting exposes more flesh to salt and smoke and allows faster
  drying. Whole fish unless small take a long unpredictable time to do.
  Small whole fish benefit from having the skin slit to allow
  penetration. Large sides of fish salt and smoke easier if the fillet
  is chunked into pieces according to thickness. Individual pieces can
  then be salted, smoked and dried for varying times according to the
  thickness of each piece. Thick pieces can be used for lox and Scotch
  smoked that are later thinly sliced crosswise for presentation  and
  thin pieces hot or hard smoked, kippered, canned for serving whole.
 
  Salt: is necessary for flavor, releasing moisture from the fish
  thereby drying ut and for modifying [firming up] the flesh so that it
  can be thin sliced when serving.  N.B. Use only PURE pickling salt
  not rock salt of unknown purity or table salt that contains additives.
 
  Curing: is the process of draining off the brine and partially drying
  the fish. The flavor develops fully during this waiting time [ of up
  to 24 hours] before actually smoking.
 
  Smoking: is generally done today in forced draft units to get a
  uniform amount of smoke onto all the fish. Natural draft smokers are
  unpredictable, variable and have no natural updraft in hot weather
  unless the smoker is set over 85 deg which results in poor quality
  and cooked fish.
 
  Final preservation is important because smoked fish, except for hard
  smoked, is still perishable. We salt and smoke lightly for [mild]
  flavor and not for preservation. Therefore refrigerate [up to three
  weeks max], freeze or can promptly.
 
  Extracted from: Smoking Salmon & Trout by Jack Whelan. Published by:
  Airie Publishing, Deep Bay, B.C. ISBN: 0-919807-00-3 Posted by: Jim
  Weller


     Title: Smoking Salmon and Trout #4 - Scotch Smoking Preparation
Categories: Fish, Smoked, Info
     Yield: 1 Text file

          Information only

  This method is first as it is the most well known and the best; it is
  also the most complex.
 
  Scotch smoking can be done to a whole side, that is a large skin-on
  fillet or to several pieces cut according to thickness which is
  easier. Don't brine a whole side as the thinner parts- the tail and
  belly get too much salt. Dry salt instead- this allows you to place a
  specific amount of salt on each part of the side according to its
  thickness. Let the developing brine drain off. With pieces you can
  brine for varying times according to thickness.
 
  For dry salting use plain pickling salt not a mixture to condition the
  flesh so it can be thinly sliced for serving. Other flavors can be
  added after. When brining pieces sugar and spices can be added to the
  brine if you want.
 
  Dry salting whole sides: Cut thick [over 4"] fillets into two slices
  OR inject brine into the thickest portion with a pumping needle.
  Injection brine should be made up in the ratio of 1 1/4 c salt per
  quart water, cooled to 60 deg F and injected before applying the dry
  salt. Score or cut just through the skin into the fatty tissues
  beneath [slashes] in several places with a sharp knife or a razor
  blade to promote salt penetration and apply the salt. Rub salt into
  the scores, lay the fillet down on a 1/4" bed of salt in a tray and
  place salt on the top of the fillet- from a 1/2" on the thickest part
  to just a sprinkling on the tail. Slant the tray so that the brine
  that develops flows away from the thin belly meat.
 
  Fatty fish take longer to salt as they contain proportionately less
  water.
                         DRY SALT TIMES
 
  :Fillet Thickness              Fat Fish                Lean Fish
 
  :      3/4"                     9 hrs                   5 hrs
  :        1"                    12 hrs                   7 hrs
  :    1 1/4"                    15 hrs                 8.5 hrs
  :    1 1/2"                    18 hrs                  10 hrs
  :        2"                    24 hrs                  13 hrs
  :    2 1/2"                    30 hrs                  17 hrs
  :        3"                    36 hrs                  20 hrs
 
  With experience you can tell by feel; a moderately fat fish will
  loose 10% of its weight. When touched with a fore finger the flesh
  should feel firm and spring back when pressed.
 
  After salting you can use a special Scotch sugar-rum cure or a
  finishing brine.
 
  Scotch sugar-rum cure: rinse the dry salt off the side. Drain and
  cure it in a cool place for 6 hours. Rub it with vegetable oil [olive
  or peanut preferred] and let it stand another 6 hours in a cool
  place. Rub off the oil with a rum soaked cloth. Cover the side with
  brown sugar just as you did the dry salt and let it stand another 6
  hours. Then wipe off the sugar, coat it with oil again and let stand
  6 hours. Wipe off the oil again with a rum soaked cloth and proceed
  to smoke.
 
  Finishing brine: If not using the scotch sugar-rum cure, use a
  finishing brine to take away some of the hardness caused by the dry
  salt and finish distributing the salt through the fish. Make
  finishing brine in the ratio of 11 oz salt to 4 qt water and leave
  the side in the brine for 20 min for a 3/4" fillet up to 90 min for a
  2" thick fillet. Drain the side skin side down making sure the brine
  can drain away so there are no salt deposits on the fish. A salt
  gloss will form and the flesh will cure. Allow to cure overnight 12
  hours or even more.
 
  Extracted from: Smoking Salmon & Trout by Jack Whelan. Published by:
  Airie Publishing, Deep Bay, B.C. ISBN: 0-919807-00-3 Posted by: Jim
  Weller


     Title: Smoking Salmon and Trout #5 - Scotch Smoking Prep Continu
Categories: Fish, Smoked, Info
     Yield: 1 Text file

          Information Only

  Wet brining pieces for Scotch smoking: You can use a plain brine or a
  sugar-spice-salt brine.
 
  Plain brine: prepare in the same ratio as injection brine above. Cool
  brine to below 50 F and keep the fish and brine cool throughout the
  process.
 
                     PLAIN SALT BRINING TIMES
 
  :Piece thickness                 Fat fish                Lean fish
 
  :      3/4"                     2 hrs                   1 1/3 hrs
  :        1"                     3 hrs                       2 hrs
  :    1 1/4"                     4 hrs                   2 2/3 hrs
  :    1 1/2"                     5 hrs                   3 1/3 hrs
  :    1 3/4"                     6 hrs                       4 hrs
  :        2"                     8 hrs                   5 1/3 hrs
  :    2 1/2"  *                 10 hrs                   6 2/3 hrs
  :        3"  *                 12 hrs                       8 hrs
 
  * These thicker pieces will benefit from brine injection with a
  needle.
 
  Salt-sugar-spice brine: ratio 4 1/2 c pickling salt and 1 1/2 c white
  or brown sugar to 4 qt water. Add, adjusting to taste, 50 bay leaves
  or 2 tb mace or 8 tsp peeper or 5 tb juniper berries. simmer the
  spices in brine 45 min. Strain brine through a cloth, discard spices
  and cool the brine.
 
                  SUGAR-SPICE-SALT BRINING TIMES
 
  :Piece thickness                Fat fish                   Lean fish
 
  :     3/4"                  2 1/2 hrs                   1 1/2 hrs
  :       1"                  3 1/2 hrs                   2 1/2 hrs
  :   1 1/4"                  4 3/4 hrs                   3 1/4 hrs
  :   1 1/2"                      6 hrs                       4 hrs
  :   1 3/4"                  7 1/4 hrs                   4 3/4 hrs
  :       2"                  9 1/2 hrs                   6 1/2 hrs
  :   2 1/2"                     12 hrs                       8 hrs
  :       3"                 14 1/4 hrs                   9 1/2 hrs
 
  These times are just a guide; each fish is different. When done the
  flesh will be firm enough for slicing and feel like the lean part of
  a slab of bacon when pressed between the thumb and forefinger.
 
  After brining, place the fish pieces skin side down so they can
  drain. Tilt the drain trays so that the brine runs off the fish to
  prevent salt deposit build up on the fish. cure 12 hrs at a temp
  below 70 F
 
  Extracted from: Smoking Salmon & Trout by Jack Whelan. Published by:
  Airie Publishing, Deep Bay, B.C. ISBN: 0-919807-00-3 Posted by: Jim
  Weller


     Title: Smoking Salmon and Trout #6 - Scotch Smoking
Categories: Fish, Smoked, Info
     Yield: 1 Text file

          Information Only

  How to Scotch smoke: the properly salted and cured salmon now needs
  smoke color and flavor and sufficient drying for good taste and
  texture. Often the fish needs more drying time than smoking time to
  avoid an overly smoky flavor. In smokers with supplementary heat
  drying can continue after smoking at the same temp -85 deg F. In
  smokers without supplementary heat use a small clear fire with as
  little smoke as possible. The amount of color depends not on the
  amount of smoke deposited but the temp.
 
  Smoking Sequence: ~Smoke for sufficient color. ~Dry further without
  smoke to firm up if necessary. ~Give the fish a polished look. ~Sweat
  the fish to firm up. ~Refrigerate for further firming.
 
  Smoking:- In a forced draft smoker, smoke temp at 85 F, time 10-12
  hrs, smoke density medium. in a natural draft smoker, 85 deg, up to
  24 hrs depending on the weather [you get stronger updrafts at 85 deg
  on cool days- if the ambient temp is 85 or more the smoker will have
  NO updraft!], smoke density light to medium.
 
  Drying: Forced- 1-3 hrs at 85 without smoke. Natural-up to 24 hours
  at 85 with as clear a flame as possible so as not to over smoke.
 
  Polish: Give the fish a moderate burst of heat [100 deg f] for 15 min
  to bring the oil to the surface.
 
  Weight Loss: From salting and smoking/drying should run around 18% for
  fatty fish up to 25% for lean.
 
  Sweating: For fish that are still not firm enough, sweat the fish by
  leaving in a cool place 24 hrs. Moisture will come to the surface.
  Then continue drying in the smoker.
 
  Refrigerate: Difficult fish improve by letting the fish condition a
  few days in the refrigerator unwrapped before slicing.
 
  Storage: Cool the fish before wrapping. Even at 85 the fish will
  sweat if wrapped before cooling and spoil quickly. Freeze any surplus
  as Scotch smoked fish is still perishable.
 
  Serving: Slice very thinly. Serve with rye or pumpernickel bread and
  unsalted butter or cream cheese. Pass around lemon wedges and the
  pepper grinder. Garnish with sliced or grated hard cooked egg, paper
  thin onion slices and capers, country ham slices and home made
  flavored mayonnaises.
 
  Extracted from: Smoking Salmon & Trout by Jack Whelan. Published by:
  Airie Publishing, Deep Bay, B.C. ISBN: 0-919807-00-3 Posted by: Jim
  Weller


     Title: Smoking Salmon and Trout #7 - Kippering And Barbecuing
Categories: Fish, Smoked, Info
     Yield: 1 Text file

          Information only

  These are different processes from Scotch smoking which is cold
  smoking- the fish remains raw. Kippering and barbecuing are hot smoke
  processes where the fish is cooked. In barbecuing you have no control
  over the heat; the smoke is hot only. The fish is placed in a
  pre-heated smoke oven and kept there until cooked. The only control
  is smoke on or off during prolonged cooking. In kippering you
  gradually bring up the heat to condition the fish before final hot
  smoking and cooking.
 
  The salting procedures are the same for both cooking methods. You can
  kipper or barbecue whole sides for special occasions but pieces of
  fillets cut according to thickness is easier to salt and smoke cook.
  You can dry salt, plain or mixed, whole sides and wet brine, plain or
  mixed, pieces. Thick sides are hard to dry salt so either slice into
  two thinner fillets or inject brine.
 
  Plain salt:Score the skins as for dry salting before Scotch curing and
  place the salt the same way. The time required is 1/3 as much as for
  Scotch smoking and 1/6 if brine is injected. This is because Scotch
  smoked fish must be thoroughly conditioned so as to be able to slice
  it thinly but here we are just adding enough salt for flavor. Also
  Scotch smoked fish is an appetizer, a tid-bit and can be salty to the
  taste but kippered and barbecued fish is a main course. After dry
  salting, simply rinse off the salt and drain before cooking.
 
  Salt mixes: add 3/4  cup white or brown sugar to each 2 1/4 c
  pickling salt and optionally add up to 50 bay leaves, 8 tsp pepper, 2
  tb mace, 7 tsp allspice, 2 1/4 tb cloves, or 2 tb juniper berries.
  Prepare the side for salting as for dry salting for Scotch smoking
  and place the salt as for Scotch smoked fish. The time required is
  1/2 as much as for Scotch smoked fish or 1/4 if brine is injected.
 
  Plain Brine: Prepare brine [2 1/2 c salt to 2 qt water] and cool to
  50 deg. Keep fish and brine cool at all times. Stir pieces from time
  to time. The time required is about 3/8 as much as for plain brining
  for Scotch smoking. Drain fish coming out of the brine before
  smoking/cooking.
 
  Sugar-Spice Brine: Prepare brine as for Scotch smoked sugar spice
  brine. Time: 3/8 as much as Scotch smoked method. Drain fish coming
  out of the brine before smoking/cooking.
 
  Reusing brines: Because the fish has absorbed sugar and salt and
  released water, you must bring the brine back up to strength by
  adding more salt or mix. Use a salinometer to be accurate and bring
  back up to 90deg salinity.
 
  Smoking Kippered Salmon: Drying- is important for appearance and
  flavor. During drying the salt soluble protein protein from the fish
  forms a skin on the surface called a pellicle which combines with the
  smoke for a pleasant appearance and most of the smoke flavor. Methods
  of drying include hanging under building eaves in a breeze out of the
  sun, with a fan, a forced draft smoker and a small clear fire in a
  natural draft smoker. Dry at 100 deg with maximum draft for 1 1/2 hr
  [forced draft] or 3-4 hours [natural draft].
 
  First smoking- 1 hr, medium density at 100 deg.
 
  Tempering- is gradual as opposed to sudden heating and is important
  for appearance and quality, so soluble protein juice does not pool on
  the surface and form curds or the flesh dry unevenly and crack.
  Gradually raise the temp to 175 with medium smoke over an hour.
 
  Second Smoking- 1 hr at max. smoke at 175. Take thinner pieces out of
  the smoker now and give the thick pieces 1 more hour.
 
  Barbecued fish: after salting or brining, place in a hot pre-heated
  smoker and cook until fish flakes readily.
 
  Storage: of kippered or barbecued fish. Cool as quickly as possible.
  Do not wrap before it has cooled or it will spoil. Freeze the surplus
  promptly.
 
  Extracted from: Smoking Salmon & Trout by Jack Whelan. Published by:
  Airie Publishing, Deep Bay, B.C. ISBN: 0-919807-00-3 Posted by: Jim
  Weller


     Title: Smoking Salmon and Trout #8 - Making Lox
Categories: Fish, Smoked, Info
     Yield: 1 Text file

          Information only

  There are three products called Lox: old fashioned Lox, Nova Lox and
  Lox Salmon [ plus a whole lot of other smoked and pickled products
  using the name but bearing little resemblance to any of these].
 
  Old fashioned Lox: Freshen mild-salted fish [salting instructions
  follow in a later chapter] by soaking in several changes of water.
  Thin pieces will require less time than thick pieces that may take up
  to 24 hours. Test by tasting, remembering that the subsequent smoking
  will dry the fish and concentrate the saltiness. Drain the freshened
  fish on the smoking racks. Smoke at 85 deg F with medium density
  smoke for 6-8 hrs [forced draft] or 12-16 hrs [natural draft]. Cool
  the fish before wrapping and freeze any surplus. Lox is perishable.
 
  Nova Lox and Lox Salmon: Fish may be either fresh or frozen. Frozen is
  actually better as the freezing and thawing removes some of the
  moisture. If the fish are frozen whole, fillet them when they are
  half thawed. Cut into pieces according to thickness. Use the thick
  portions for Lox and the thin ones in kippering, drying, canning or
  eating fresh. Make a dry salt-sugar mix of equal parts sugar and
  pickling salt. Dry salt by placing the pieces in a container of mix.
  Cover each piece but do not rub it into the flesh. Sprinkle some mix
  into a container and lay the salt mix dredged pieces on it skin side
  down. Sprinkle each layer with more mix and add another layer etc.
  Times for salting according to thickness are the same as for Scotch
  smoked dry salting above.
 
  Remove the pieces from the mix, rinse and drain. Now brine the pieces
  in 90 deg sal brine [2 1/2 c salt per 2 qts water] with optional bay
  leaves included. Keep brine and fish cool throughout the process.
  Then freshen the fish under running water more or less to taste; the
  table is just an approximation.
 
                  BRINING AND FRESHENING TIMES
 
  Thickness             Brining Time            Freshening Time
 
:  3/4"                    9 hrs                     45 min
:    1"                   12 hrs                      1 hr 1 1/2" 18 hrs
:  1 1/2
:    2"                   24 hrs                      2 hrs
 
  At this point decide whether you want smoked Nova Lox or unsmoked Lox
  Salmon. For Nova Lox smoke as for old fashioned Lox. For Lox Salmon
  the pieces must be dried without heat until firm enough for slicing.
  A frost free refrigerator will dry uncovered Lox enough to firm it.
 
  Extracted from: Smoking Salmon & Trout by Jack Whelan. Published by:
  Airie Publishing, Deep Bay, B.C. ISBN: 0-919807-00-3 Posted by: Jim
  Weller


     Title: Smoking Salmon and Trout #9 - Indian or Hard Smoked
Categories: Fish, Smoked, Info
     Yield: 1 Text file

          Information only

  Low-fat fish make the longest keeping hard smoked fish as it is the
  fat that causes rancidity.  Very fat hard smoked fish should be
  frozen or salted until just before eating. Medium fat fish will last
  a week unrefrigerated before starting to go slightly rancid. And lean
  fish will keep indefinitely unrefrigerated. Hard smoked fish can be
  made from fresh, frozen or hard salted fish [instructions for hard
  salting follow in a later chapter].
 
  Hard salted fish should be freshened before smoking. Depending on the
  hardness of the salting, your taste and the thickness of the pieces
  to be smoked this may take 24 to 48 hours with water changes every 3
  to 6 hours. There should be no salty taste left as the drying will
  concentrate any saltiness remaining. Other products retain 50 to 75%
  of their original moisture but hard smoked fish only 6%
 
  Fresh fish and thawed frozen fish should be very lightly brined if at
  all. Brining draws out moisture and cuts drying time but salt also
  speeds fat rancidity in the finished product. Make a 90 deg sal brine
  and soak pieces no more than:
 
                       BRINING TIMES
 
  :     Thickness                               Time
 
  :      1/4"                                   2 min
  :      1/2"                                   4 min
  :      3/4"                                   7 min
  :        1"                                  10 min
  :    1 1/2"                                  15 min
  :        2"                                  20 min
 
  Smoking directions: Smoke for only a portion of the total drying
  period according to taste. Dry at 85 deg F for 30 hrs with a forced
  draft smoker and up to 3 weeks with a natural draft depending on the
  weather or until the fish is completely dry and hard.
 
  Extracted from: Smoking Salmon & Trout by Jack Whelan. Published by:
  Airie Publishing, Deep Bay, B.C. ISBN: 0-919807-00-3 Posted by: Jim
  Weller


     Title: Smoking Salmon and Trout #10 - Smoking Small Trout
Categories: Fish, Smoked, Info
     Yield: 1 Text file

          Information only

  Unboned: Make an 80 deg sal brine with 8.5 oz salt per quart water,
  score skin and brine 1 hr. Spit them through the eyes with a heavy
  wire [a welding rod works well here]and hold the belly open with
  small match stick sized sticks. Dry at 90 deg F for 30 min [forced
  draft] or 1 hr or more [natural draft]. Then smoke at 160 deg F for 1
  1/2 hrs [forced] or 3 hrs or more [natural].
 
  Boned: Make an 80 deg sal brine and brine 8 min stirring often.
  Depending on the shape desired and the boning method used, spit
  through the eyes and prop open with match stick sized wood, or hang
  over a dowel, or rolled and skewered. Drying and smoking temps and
  times are the same as for unboned.
 
  Extracted from: Smoking Salmon & Trout by Jack Whelan. Published by:
  Airie Publishing, Deep Bay, B.C. ISBN: 0-919807-00-3 Posted by: Jim
  Weller


     Title: Smoking Salmon and Trout #11 - Pickled Smoked Fish
Categories: Fish, Smoked, Info, Pickles
     Yield: 1 Text file

          Information only

  Pickle smoked: fish are pickled before smoking. This is a good way to
  enhance the taste of lean fish that do not otherwise smoke well.
 
  Prepare and defat skinless fillets: To do this, when you fillet, leave
  plenty of meat on the backbone where the meat is especially fat. Cut
  off the belly portion. Skin the fillet leaving about 1/8" meat on the
  skin. Make cuts on either side of the lateral line, lift it out and
  discard it. Divide the fillet into pieces of different thickness.
 
  The pickling procedure is similar to corning meats. The flavored
  sugar-salt brine is weaker than normally used and the fish brined
  longer to achieve a cured taste. prepare brine in the following
  proportions: 4 tb mixed pickling spice, 3 cups salt and 2 cups brown
  sugar per 4 qts water. Keep the brine and fish below 45 deg F at all
  times. Use a salinometer and maintain salinity at 60 deg minimum at
  all times adding more salt periodically if needed. Don't over pickle;
  remove the thinner pieces as they become cured.
 
                      PICKLING TIMES
 
  :Fillet thickness                Fat Fish                Lean Fish
  :     1/2"                      30 hrs                  20 hrs
  :     3/4"                      40 hrs                  30 hrs
  :       1"                   2 1/2 days                 40 hrs
  :   1 1/4"                       3 days                  2 days
  :   1 1/2"                   3 1/2 days              2 1/2 days
  :   1 3/4"                       4 days                  3 days
  :       2"                       5 days              3 1/2 days
  :   2 1/2"                       6 days              4 1/4 days
  :       3"                       7 days                  5 days
 
  Overhaul [stir and move around] the pieces daily to ensure even
  pickling. When ready rinse off the pieces and let water drain off.
  Cold smoke at medium density 7 to 10 hours depending on thickness or
  30 to 48 hours natural draft depending on thickness and weather.
  Continue until the flesh is firm enough for slicing. Cool the
  finished product almost onto freezing before wrapping to prevent
  sweating and spoilage. Freeze the surplus. Serve as for Lox and
  Scotch smoked.
 
  Extracted from: Smoking Salmon & Trout by Jack Whelan. Published by:
  Airie Publishing, Deep Bay, B.C. ISBN: 0-919807-00-3 Posted by: Jim
  Weller


     Title: Smoking Salmon and Trout #12 - Making Seelachs
Categories: Fish, Smoked, Info
     Yield: 1 Text file

          Information only

  Seelachs: or ersatz salmon are salted, sliced thin, then dyed and
  smoked white fish. they can be made from fresh, frozen or salted
  white fish. Fillet the fish skin on. For ling keeping, hard salt the
  fillets. For immediate use dry salt. Then freshen the fish. Slice the
  fish as thin as possible. Dye the slices using a solution of 5 oz
  water, 30 drops red food color dye and 45 drops yellow food dye.
  Dying time varies from 15 min to an hour. Test by cutting a slice to
  check penetration every 15 min. Drain the pieces well. Cold smoke 30
  to 60 min or 1 to 2 hrs natural draft. Pack the slices on olive or
  any vegetable oil. Refrigerate. It will last up to one month if
  fairly salty. Completely freshened fish is more perishable.
 
  Extracted from: Smoking Salmon & Trout by Jack Whelan. Published by:
  Airie Publishing, Deep Bay, B.C. ISBN: 0-919807-00-3 Posted by: Jim
  Weller